Type
Word Search
Description

band wagon
either or choices
emotional argument
equivocation
ethical argument
fallacies
false authority
logical
red herring
scare tactics
sentimental
slippery slope
stack the deck

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

falsely assumes that one thing leads to another Slippery Slope
misrepresents a position to make it sound weaker Straw Man
authority figure affirms incoherent proposition Appeal to Authority
idea must be true because it is the popular opinion Appeal to Popularity
idea is dismissed because of who the source is Genetic
fallacy of distraction Red Herring
an assumption one makes based on insufficient evidence or biased information Hasty Generalization
someone is asked to choose between two ideas Flase Dichotomy
the reasoner beginswith what they are trying to end with Circular Argument
A question with a false, disputed, or question-begging presupposition. Loaded Question
An argument is given from which a perfectly valid and sound conclusion may be drawn, yet the stated conclusion is something else Missing the Point

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Comparing two things as though they are actually alike when they have key features that are different. False Analogy
The fallacy of composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that is true of some part of the whole Fallacy of Composition
Assuming casual relationships between two events based solely on the two events happening close in time, or "after this, therefore because of this." False Cause Fallacy
"Domino theory" and "ripple affect" aka one thing leads to another Slippery slope
Attacking someone personally while criticizing them in a totally different arena Ad hominem
Purposely misinterpeting or mistaking an opponents argument as a way to make it easier to denigrate or attack Straw Man Fallacy
Bringing up irrelevant issues that have more emotional appeal than the real issues in order to divert attention away from the point Red Herring
Claiming that a statement/argument is more valid because it comes from an authority figure Appeal to Authority
Claiming that a position is valid because it hasn't been proven wrong Ad Ignorantium
Claiming that the majority opinion must be the correct opinion Ad Populum

Satire Crossword Puzzle

Type
Crossword
Description

Celebrities Big Name
Emotion Pathos
Strong emotional implications Loaded Words
Being smaller Understatement
Imitation of a style Parody
Exaggeration Hyperbole
2 things with contrast Juxtaposition
Logic Logos
Illegitimate use of "or" False Dilemma
Attack on an opponent Ad Hominem
Irrelevant conclusion Non Sequitur
Fallacy which conclusion is not logical Hasty Generalization
Everyone believes it Bandwagon
Irrelevant topic diverts attention Red Herring
Flattery Appeal To Flattery
Credibility or character Ethos
Chain reaction Slippery Slope
Argument never gets to the point Circular Argument
Makes you think Rhetorical Question
Exaggerated Exaggeration
Contrast between 2 things Irony
Criticizes issues Satire

Logical Fallacies Word Search

Type
Word Search
Description

middle ground
the texas sharpshooter
genetic
no true scotsman
ambiguity
burden of proof
personal incredulity
tu quoque
the fallacy fallacy
appeal to emotion
anecdotal
composition/division
appeal to nature
appeal to authority
begging the question
black or white
bandwagon
the gambler's fallacy
loaded question
special pleading
ad hominem
slippery slope
false cause
strawman

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

a tactic used by many writers, especially in advertising. An expert in one field may know nothing of another field. Being knowledgeable in one area doesn’t constitute knowledge in other areas. False Authority
one step will inevitably lead to more, eventually negative steps. While sometimes the results may be negative, this argues that the descent is inevitable and unalterable. Slippery Slope
when the writer presents an arguable point as a fact that supports the argument. This error leads to an argument that goes around and around, with evidence making the same claim as the proposition. Begging the Question
assume a faulty causal relationship. One event following another in time does not mean that the first event caused the later event. Writers must be able to prove that one event caused another event and did not simply follow in time. Post Hoc
Writers often use similar situations to explain a relationship. Sometimes, though, these extended comparisons and metaphors attempt to relate ideas or situations that upon closer inspection aren’t really that similar. Faulty Analogies
The conclusion doesn’t logically follow the explanation. Non Sequitur
Writers may draw conclusions too quickly, not considering the whole issue. They may look only at a small group as representative of the whole or may look only at a small piece of the issue. Hasty Generalization
Desperate arguers often try to change the ground of the argument by changing the subject. The new subject may be related to the original argument, but does little to resolve it. Red Herring
Writers who fall into this fallacy attempt to refute the claims of the opposition by bringing the opposition’s character into question. Ad Hominem
These arguments reduce complex issues to black and white choices. Either Or Argument
Writers may also pick only the opposition’s weakest or most insignificant point to refute. Doing so diverts attention from the real issues and rarely, if ever, leads to resolution or truth. Opposing A Straw Man
Rather than answering the question that has been asked or addressing the issue at hand, the writer shifts focus, supplying an unrelated argument. Ignoring the Question
This fallacy happens when the writer makes use of a word’s multiple meanings and changes the meanings in the middle of the argument without really telling the audience about the shift. Equivocation

Propaganda Word Wall Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

something that misleads or distracts from a relevant or important issue Red Herring
s applying a general rule to a specific instance (without proper evidence) sweeping generalization
popular party, faction, or cause that attracts growing support —often used in such phrases as jump on the bandwagon bandwagon
information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view. propaganda
is a logical fallacy in which the reasoner begins with what they are trying to end with. circular argument
s an improper appeal to emotion used for the purpose of swaying the opinions of an audience. propaganda techniques
links a person, or idea, to a negative symbol. name-calling
a formal statement testifying to someone's character and qualifications testimonial
a formal statement testifying to someone's character and qualifications repetition
is a kind of fallacy that is an irrelevant topic introduced in an argument to divert the attention of listeners or readers from the original issue. Red herring

The Fallacy Detective Word Search

Type
Word Search
Description

Ad Hominen
Appeal to the People
Assumptions
Circular Reasoning
Equivocation
Fallacy
Faulty Appeal to Authority
Genetic Fallacy
Loaded Question
Part-to-Whole
Red Herring
Straw Man
The Fallacy Detective
Tu Quoque
Whole-to-Part

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

You misinterpret someone's argument to make it easier to attack. Strawman
You say that if we allow A to happen, then Z will eventually follow. Slippery Slope
You move the goalposts or make up an an exception when your claim was shown to be false. Special Pleading
You say runs occur to statistically independent phenomena. Gambler's Fallacy
You present two alternative states as the only possibilities, when in fact more exist. Black or White
You presume that a real or perceived relationship between things mean that one is the cause of the other False Cause
You attack your opponent's character in an attempt to undermine their argument. Adhominem
You ask a question that has a presumption built into it. loaded question
You appeal to popularity as an attempt at validation Bandwagon
You present a circular argument in which the conclusion was included in the premise Begging the question
You say that because an authority thinks something, it must be true. appeal to authority
You argue that because something is natural, it is therefore valid or ideal. appeal to nature
You assume that one part of something has to be applied to the rest. Compositiondivision
You use a personal experience instead of a sound argument. Anecdotal
You attempt to manipulate an emotional response in place of a valid argument. appeal to emotion
You avoid having to engage with criticism by turning it back on your opponent. tu quoque
You say that the burden of proof lies with someone to disprove your claim. Burden of proof
You make what could be called an appeal to purity as a way to dismiss relevant criticisms. no true scotsman
You cherry pick a data cluster to suit your argument. Texas sharpshooter

Ethos, Pathos, Logos Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Appealing to emotion Pathos
Appeal to logic Logos
Appeal to ethics or character Ethos
Stance on an argument Claim
Examining the other side Counterclaim
Art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing Rhetoric
First person to write about rhetoric Aristotle
Go back to original argument Rebuttal
instinctive or intuitive feeling as distinguished from reasoning or knowledge Emotions
Reasoning conducted or assessed according to strict principles of validity Logic
Knowledge that deals with moral principles Ethics

Critical vocabulary crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

the side of an issue the writer favors Bias
exaggerates the traits of an idea or person Caricature
the main argument of an essay Claim
a statement that many people assume to be true but which may or may not be so Commonplace assertion
an argument that disproves or answers the opposing viewpoint Counter argument
can be proven with data, observations, and reliable sources Factual claim
an untrue idea from which an argument develops; if the starting idea is false, the rest of the argument is probably false incorrect premise
a question that tries to “lead” a person to give a specific answer Leading question
a word or phrase intended to provoke a strong emotional reaction in the audience Loaded term
a type of fallacy (mistaken belief) dependent upon faulty, unreliable logic Logical fallacy
states a belief, feeling, or value but cannot be proven Opinion
techniques that can influence the beliefs and actions of the reader or audience (ethos, pathos, logos) Persuasive appeals
the basic statement upon an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn Premise
distracting the reader with various appeals instead of using sound reasoning; can be emotional, ethical, or logical in nature Rhetorical fallacy
a sentence stating an argument about a topic Thesis
the quality of being factually or logically sound Validity