Type
Crossword
Description

Materials not found in nature Synthetic
Materials extracted from the earth Natural
Main use of plastic Packaging
A process in which heated plastic is sucked into a mold Vacuum
A plastic which cannot be remolded once processed Thermoset
A plastic which can be heated and remolded several times Thermoplastic
What percent of our energy is used to make plastic Three
A product most found in our dumps Paper
Name of a hot tube of plastic used in blow molding Parison
Raw plastic is melted and formed into a continuous profile Extrusion
Plastic parts are formed and can be joined together Blow Molding
Process which rotates a mold biaxially Rotational
Large molecules of plastic Polymers
Which process requires a heated mold dipped into liquid Plastisol
Two or more small molecules combine to form larger molecules Polymerization

Plastics and Polymers Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

The process of forming a large molecule by linking together smaller subunits Polymerization
A six carbon aromatic compound with alternating C=C double bonds Benzene
One of the small repeating units of a polymer Monomer
The process of growing a polymer chain Propagation
The combination of two molecules through the loss of a smaller molecule such as H2O Condensation
The combination of molecules by sharing electrons with an adjacent molecule Addition
A polymer that springs back after being twisted or pulled Elastomer
The disorder of molecules Entropy
Type of polymer that cannot be reformed or remolded after initial heat-forming Thermoset
Type of polymer that is remoldable when heated Thermoplastic
Natural component of first synthesized plastics Cellulose
Polystyrene produced when the phenol groups alternate on its backbone chain Syndiotactic
Additive that gives plastics flexibility and durability Plasticizer
Component of first the synthesized plastic Nitrate
Component of Safety Celluloid Acetate
Type of polymer formed from two or more repeating monomers Alternating
Without a clearly defined form or shape Amorphous
Type of natural thermoplastic Tortoiseshell
First plastic made from fully synthetic materials Bakelite
Type of rubber formed by heating with sulfur Vulcanized

Natural Resources Crossword Puzzle

Type
Crossword
Description

Any material made naturally that is used by humans or living things. Natural Resources
A natural resource that can be used and replaced over a relatively short time. Renewable Resource
A natural resource that cannot be replaced or that can be replaced only over thousands or millions of years. Nonrenewable resource
Energy as solar, wind, or nuclear energy that can replace traditional fossil fuel sources, such as coal, oil, and natural gas. Alternative energy
Renewable energy derived from burning organic materials such as wood and alcohol. Biomass energy
Conservation method in which old materials are processed to make new ones. Recycling
Nonrenewable energy resource, such as oil and coal, formed over millions of years from the remains of dead plants and other organisms. Fossil Fuel
Inexhaustible energy resource that used hot magma or hot, dry rocks from below Earth's surface to generate electricity. Geothermal energy
Electricity produced by water-power using large dams in a river. Hydroelectric energy
Alternative energy source that is based on atomic fission. Nuclear energy
Energy from the Sun that is clean, inexhaustible, and can be transformed into electricity by solar cells. Solar energy
Careful use of resources to reduce damage to the environment though such methods as composting and recycling materials. Conservation
A resource that remains in constant supply and will not run out. Inexhaustible source
Fossil fuel formed from marine organisms that is often found in tilted or folded rock layers and is used for cooking and heating. Natural gas

Ceramic Vocabulary Crossword Puzzle

Type
Crossword
Description

clay that has dried slightly from the plastic stage, can be joined using water, but has become a bit too fragile to bend and shape at lot. leather hard
Clay that has completely dried out, but has not been fired yet. bone dry
Clay objects that have been fired one time, turning the clay into glass. At this stage, clay is ready to be stained, painted or glazed. Bisqueware
Clay that has been applied with glaze or underglazes and then fired a second time. glazeware
a term that refers to one of several techniques used to build pottery using only the hands and simple tools, rather than using the potter’s wheel. handbuilding
This technique is a method of shaping clay by inserting the thumb of one hand into a ball of clay and lightly pinching between the thumb and the fingers, while slowly rotating the ball of clay in the palm of the other hand. pinch pots
a handbuilding technique used to construct ceramic forms by rolling out ropes of clay and joining them together with the fingers and various smoothing tools. coil pots
a handbuilding of technique used to construct ceramic forms by rolling out a flat “pancake-like” piece of clay which can then be cut into shapes and built into a box. slab pots
the process of mixing and turning clay to remove air pockets and create uniform consistency in the clay. wedging
a technique used to connect two pieces of clay by scratching into the surfaces of each piece of clay and then applying watered down clay to each piece before pressing the pieces together. slip and score
to draw or scratch lines into the clay surface, to either connect two pieces of clay or add texture. score
a process in which clay is heated to high temperatures in a kiln, which melts the silica sand in the clay and when it cools turns to glass, making the form permanent. firing
a furnace of refractory clay bricks used to heat pottery or fuse glass. kiln
glass-forming chemicals, usually with coloring compounds added, that is applied in a liquid form to bisqueware clay and fired in a kiln, forming a pleasing coating around the surface of the clay. glaze
Pottery which can not only serve as an art object but can also be used for a purpose, such as bowls, plates, cups. functional pottery
the usually narrower part that leads from the body of a pot or vase to the mouth. neck
this is the main part of the pot or vase. It usually the largest part of the pot or vase. body
this is the part of the pot or vase that meets or rests on the floor or table. foot
a decoration technique in which lines are carefully drawn into a clay surface. carving
process in which material is steadily built up to produce the finished figure additive
a large container, typically earthenware, glass, or plastic, with a handle and a lip, used for holding and pouring liquids pitcher
a pot with a handle, spout, and lid, in which tea is brewed and from which it is poured teapot
a round, deep dish or basin used for food or liquid bowl
a small, bowl-shaped container for drinking from, typically having a handle cup
a strong, coarse unbleached cloth made from cotton, or a similar yarn, used as a surface for clay handbuilding canvas
a board used as a base for handbuilng and storing clay projects bat

Polymers Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

What small molecules like ethene are called? monomers
What is the process of joining together molecules like ethene to form long chains of atoms called? polymerisation
What are large molecules consisting of thousands of monomers often called? macromolecule
Which polymer is commonly used for shopping bags and bottles? polythene
Which polymer is commonly used for packing and insulation? polystyrene
Which polymer is commonly used for rope and carpet fibres? polypropene
What type of problem occurs because of dumping non-biodegradable plastics? pollution
Incineration of non-biodegradable plastics causes what to be released? toxins
Two different monomers joined by an ester link are often called? polyesters
What is it called when a water molecule is lost each time 2 starting molecules link up? condensation polymerisation
What link is formed as nylon? amide
What type of bond is between the two carbons? double bond
What type of insulator can polythene be used as? electrical
What can polythene be a substitute for? natural materials
Along with heating and high pressure what else is needed to make polythene? catalyst
Because only one product is formed in polymerisation, what is this process called? addition polymerisation
What polymer is used for non stick frying pans? teflon
What does PVC stand for? polyvinylchloride
Nylon is often woven into? fabric

The World of Polymers and Plastics Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Small molecules used to synthesize the polynmeric chain Monomer
Involve thousands of atoms and their molecular masses can reach over a million Macromolecules
A type of polymer that is thermoplastic, meaning that it can be melted to a liquid and remolded as it returns to a solid state polyethylene
Are attractions between molecules in the polymer that hold the material together Dispersion forces
Distinctive arrangements of atoms that impart characteristic chemical properties to the molecules that contain them functional groups
Covalent bond that forms between –COOH group of one amino acid and the -NH2 group of the next Peptide Bond
Nylon is another common example of what condensation polymer
A material consisting of any of a wide range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organics that are malleable and can be molded into solid objects of diverse shapes. Plastic
Compounds that are added in small amounts to polymers to make them softer and more pliable. Plasticizers
A polymer formed by the combination of two or more different monomers. copolymer
Monomers from which our body builds protiens. Amino acids
Is either a gas or a substance capable of producing a gas to manufacture a foamed plastic. Blowing Agent
A naturally abundant nutrient carbohydrate, found chiefly in the seeds, fruits, tubers, roots, and stem of plants Starch
An insoluble substance that is the main constituent of plant cell walls and of vegetable fibers such as cotton Cellulose
Condensation polymers that contain the amide functional group Polyamides

MACROMOLECULES Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

A hydrogen bond is the electrostatic attraction between polar groups that occurs when a hydrogen (H) atom bound to a highly electronegative atom such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O) or fluorine (F) experiences attraction to some other nearby highly electronegative atom. H-bonding
An organic compound is any member of a large class of gaseous, liquid, or solid chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon. organicmolecule
large molecule, such as protein, commonly created by polymerization of smaller subunits macromolecule
a molecule that may bind chemically or supramolecularly to other molecules to form a polymer monomer
a substance that has a molecular structure consisting chiefly or entirely of a large number of similar units bonded toget many synthetic organic materials polymer
biological molecule consisting of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms, usually with a hydrogen–oxygen atom ratio of 2:1 carbohydrate
called simple sugars monosaccharide
polymeric carbohydrate molecules composed of long chains of monosaccharide units bound together by glycosidic linkages and on hydrolysis give the constituent monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. polysaccharide
macromolecular biological catalysts enzyme
surface on which a plant or animal lives substrate
large biomolecules, or macromolecules, consisting of one or more long chains of amino acid residues. protein
covalent chemical bond formed between two amino acid molecules. peptidebond
biologically important organic compounds containing amine and carboxylic acid functional groups, aminoacid
a group of naturally occurring molecules that include fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins, monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, phospholipids, and others lipid
amylum is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds starch
a multibranched polysaccharide of glucose that serves as a form of energy storage in animals and fungi. glycogen
an insoluble substance that is the main constituent of plant cell walls and of vegetable fibers such as cotton. cellulose
holding as much water or moisture as can be absorbed; thoroughly soaked. saturated
having carbon–carbon double or triple bonds and therefore not containing the greatest possible number of hydrogen atoms for the number of carbons. unsaturated
the region of an enzyme where substrate molecules bind and undergo a chemical reaction. activesite
uncommon in nature but became commonly produced industrially from vegetable fats for use in margarine, snack food, packaged baked goods and frying fast food transfat
simple polyol compound. It is a colorless, odorless, viscous liquid that is sweet-tasting and non-toxic. glycerol
is a carboxylic acid with a long aliphatic chain, which is either saturated or unsaturated fattyacids
biopolymers, or large biomolecules, essential for all known forms of life. nucleicacids
organic molecules that serve as the monomers nucleotides
inorganic chemical and a salt of phosphoric acid. phosphate
carbohydrate with the formula C5H10O5; ribose
Deoxyribonucleic acid is a molecule that carries the genetic instructions used in the growth, development, functioning and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses DNA
Ribonucleic acid is a polymeric molecule implicated in various biological roles in coding, decoding, regulation, and expression of genes RNA
minimum energy which must be available to a chemical system with potential reactants to result in a chemical reaction. activationenergy

A Word Quest with Plastics and Polymers Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

The formal name for a chain reaction polymerization. Addition
The formal name for a step-growth polymerization reaction. Condensation
The name for a molecule, atom or ion with unpaired electrons that initiates addition polymerization. Free Radical
A type of polymer with chains of two or more monomers. Copolymer
The name for a type of copolymer whereby monomers are arranged in turns. This is needed for crystalline polymer forms. Alternating
The second step in addition polymerization whereby the chain grows (the most amount of time is spent here). Propagation
A type of polymer described as "beads on a string with charms". Branched
A step in addition polymerization whereby two free radicals join to create a stable bond. Termination
The term that describes two equal forms of a benzene molecule when single and double bonds alternate around the ring (bond length is 1.5). Resonance
The name of the molecule composed of one benzene ring with one less hydrogen that is always attached to something else. Phenyl
Epoxies are an example of this type of plastic that decomposes before it melts. They are re-used as fillers. Thermoset
Polyethylene is an example of this type of plastic that can be remolded. Thermoplastic
The term to describe the chemical bonds that form between Polyvinyl acetate chains in Borax to produce silly putty. Cross-linked
The name for amorphous polymers with low glass transition temperatures (Tg). Elastomers
A type of plastic with holes between its cross-linked chains. This plastic can swell and absorb water or solvent. Gel
A type of test (qualitative analysis) whereby plastic samples are exposed to an open flame. Hint: A green flame indicates the presence of PVC. Beilstein
Plastic used for ketchup bottles and yogurt or margarine containers. It is identified by the Recycling Number "5". Polypropylene
Composed of amide monomers represented as HNC=O. Hint: Nylon 6 is an example of this polymer. Polyamide
Phenol and formaldehyde react under heat and pressure to produce this plastic. Hint: it was the first plastic made entirely of synthetic components. Bakelite
Used to improve specific properties of plastics such as flexibility or colour, while maintaining other properties. These may migrate as the plastic ages. Additives
A residue that forms on the surface of plastics which is often oily. Blooming
A highly flammable material used as a transparent coating on photographs from 1889-early 1950s. One positive test to distinguish it from other materials is that it turns a deep blue colour in a solution of Diphenylamine with 90% Sulfuric Acid. Cellulose Nitrate
"Vinegar Syndrome" is a telling sign of the decomposition of this material also used to coat photographs starting in the 1920s. Cellulose Acetate

Introduction to Ceramics Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Clay mix with water. 50% water Slip
Used for cutting large lumps of clay, cleaning edges of cast pieces, and in removing thrown work from the potter's wheel. (2 words) Fettling Knife
Long heavy needle with a handle, one of the most versatile tools in pottery. Needle Tool
A rubber, metal or wooden tool used to facilitate throwing on the wheel and finishing surfaces in hand-building. rib
These come in a variety of shapes, used in all sorts of hand-building. (3 words) Wooden modeling tools
A natural material extracted from the earth's crust. Made of alumina+silica+water Clay
Creating a form with long, rope shaped, pieces of clay. coil
Pottery that has been fired once, without glaze, and cannot be recycled. 0% water Bisque
To heat a clay object in a kiln to a specific temperature. fire
Unfired pottery. Ready to be bisque fired. greenware
Creating ceramic shapes on the potter's wheel. Throwing
A flat disc made from plaster, wood, or plastic which is a fixed to a wheel head. bat
Pressed or rolled flat sections of clay used for hand-building. Slab
A method of kneading the clay to make it evenly mixed, remove air bubbles and to change the water content. Wedging
This is a this coat of glass. An impervious silicate coating, which is developed in clay ware by the fusion under heat of inorganic materials. Glaze
Base of a ceramic form. Foot
Clay forced through a die to form uniform shaped clay. Extrusion
To manipulate clay with your fingers in the palm to hollow a shape. pinch
The quality of clay which allows it to be manipulated into different shapes without cracking. 25% water Plasticity
The stage of clay between plasticity and bone dry. Clay is still damp enough to join it to another piece using slip. 10% water (2 words) Leather hard
Completely air dried. 2% water Bone dry
Pushing the clay down and together, forcing the particles together. Compress
Technique of moving the clay into a symmetrical rotating axis in the middle of a wheel head so you can throw it. centering
a furnace of refractory clay bricks for firing pottery and fusing glass. Kiln
A plaster shape designed to pour slip cast into and let dry so the shape comes out as an exact replica. mold
A creation of an object out of clay. ceramic

Renewable Resources Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Electricity produced by moving water, especially from across a river. hydroelectric power
The basic unit of a chemical element. atom
The surroundings or conditions in which a person, animal, or plant lives or operates. environment
The action of dividing or splitting something into two or more parts. fission
The process or result of joining two or more things together to form a single entity. fusion
A gradual increase in the overall temperature of the earth's atmosphere generally attributed to the greenhouse effect caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, and other pollutants. global warming
The time taken for the radioactivity of a specified isotope to fall to half its original value. half-life
The energy released during nuclear fission or fusion, especially when used to generate electricity. nuclear energy
The ability to do something or act in a particular way, especially as a faculty or quality. power
The emission of energy as electromagnetic waves or as moving subatomic particles, especially high-energy particles that cause ionization. radiation
The emission of ionizing radiation or particles caused by the spontaneous disintegration of atomic nuclei. radioactivity
A fuel derived directly from living matter. bio-fuel
Materials or substances such as minerals, forests, water, and fertile land that occur in nature and can be used for economic gain. natural resources
An organic natural resource which can replenish to overcome usage and consumption, either through biological reproduction or other naturally reoccurring processes. renewable resource
Radiant energy emitted by the sun. solar energy
The cycle of processes by which water circulates between the earth's oceans, atmosphere, and land, involving precipitation as rain and snow, drainage in streams and rivers, and return to the atmosphere by evaporation and transpiration. water cycle
The conversion of one form of energy into another, or the movement of energy from one place to another. energy transfer
An energy that travels by waves or particles, particularly electromagnetic radiation such as heat or x-rays. radiant energy
The perceptible natural movement of the air, especially in the form of a current of air blowing from a particular direction. wind
A hot spring in which water intermittently boils, sending a tall column of water and steam into the air. geyser
The quality of being hot; high temperature. heat
The vapor into which water is converted when heated, forming a white mist of minute water droplets in the air. steam
Of, relating to, or produced by the internal heat of the earth. geothermal

Energy Sources Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

uses rise and fall of tides to convert kinetic energy of incoming and outgoing tides into electrical energy Tidal
a viscous liquid derived from petroleum, especially for use as a fuel or lubricant. Oil
the perceptible natural movement of the air, especially in the form of a current of air blowing from a particular direction. wind
The energy the Earth receives from the sun, primarily as visible light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation solar energy
Flowing water creates energy that can be captured and turned into electricity Hydroelectric
is produced from organic material and is commonly used throughout the world Biomass
Supplies people use that are naturally found on Earth. For example, wood, water natural resources
An energy source from ancient plants and animals. For example, oil, coal, and natural gas. fossil fuels
A resource that can be replaced as needed. For example, plant-based fuels, wood, or biomass. renewable
A resource that cannot be replaced faster than it is consumed or used. For example: fossil fuels. nonrenewable
esource that uses heat from deep underground to heat up water and turn it into steam. The steam can be used to heat homes or turn turbines to make electricity. geothermal
An energy source that uses heat from nuclear fission to turn water into steam for turning turbines to make electricity nuclear power
Converts hydrogen and oxygen into water to produce electricity. This can be used in cars and the only waste product is water. fuel cells
Any source of energy other than fossil fuels that is used for constructive purposes. Alternative
The state when objects are not yet in motion. Gravitational