a giant bomb
Hydrogen Bomb
an economic or political system in which the state or the communtiy owns all the property and the means of production, and all citizens chare the wealth
communism
a U.S. plan, initated by Secretary of State George Marshall and implemented from 1948 to 1951, to aid in the economc recovery of europe after WWII by offering certain European countires substantial funds
Marshall Plan
a competiton between nations to acheive the more powerful weapons arsenal
Arms Race
a foreign policy characteized by a willingness to push a dangerous situation to the brink, or edge, af war rather than give in to an opponent
Brinkmanship
after WWII, the US foreign policy practice of attempting to restrict the expansion of Soviet influence around the world
Containment
the ideological barrier that exists between Eastern and Western Europe from 1945 to 1990
Iron Curtain
as part of the Cold War and in responce to the formation of the North Antlantic Treaty Organization, an agreement signed in 1955 by the Soviet Union, Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, and Romania to establish a military alliance fro mutual defence
Warsaw Pact
in July and August 1945 in the German city of Potsdam, a conference of the main Allied leaders - U.S. president Harry S.Truman, British prime minister Winston Curchill and later his successor Clement Atlee, and soviet premier Joseph Stalin to finalize post - WWII plans for Europe
Potsdam
the hostile but nonviolent struggle for power between the United States and the Soviet Union, as well as their respective allies, from the end of WWII to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991
Cold War
the relaxiation of Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union and between the United States and china that began under president Richard Nixon
Detente
the belief that if Vietnam fell to the communists, the rest of southwest Asia would fall like ''a ror of dominoes''
Domino Theory
a country under another countries controll
Satellite Nations
during the Arms Race between the united states and the Soviet Union, the principle that either side would respond to a nuclear attack by launching its own missles, which helped prevent the Cold War from being a hot war
Mutual Assured Destruction
a court case envolving this person, a U.S. State Department offical accused of passing secrets to the Soviet Union, that contributed to a growing fear of subversion during the early Cold War; in 1950 a federal grand jury convinced him perjury, but his guilt in regard to espionage was not proven
Alger Hiss
the large increase in the number of babies born in proportion to the size of the population that took place after WWII and lasted until 1964
Baby Boom
lasting from 1919 to 1920, a campaign launched by U.S. attorney general Mitchell Palmer and implemented by justice department attorney H. Edgar Hoover to arrest communists and other radicals who promoted the overthrow of the U.S. goverment; recived during the Cold War by Senator Joseph McCarthy during a period of anticommunism lasting from 1950 to 1957
Red Scare
a u.s. foreign policy, established in 1947 by president Harry S. Truman, of providing economic and military aid to countries--intially Greece and Turkey--that were attempting to resist communism
Truman Doctrine
the soviet blockade of the german city of Berlin, implented from 1948 to 1949 to halt land travel into the city in hopes of forcing the united states, Great britian, and france to give up their plan to combine their occupatoin zones into a single, domecratic west german state; the allied nations resisted the blockage by airlifting food and supplies into berlin
Berlin Blockade
the practice of publicy accusing people of subversive activities without evidence to back up the charges; named for senator Joseph McCarthy, who began such a practice in the early 1950s as part of the search for communists in the United States during the early Cold war
McCarthyism