Type
Crossword
Description

Comparing two things as though they are actually alike when they have key features that are different. False Analogy
The fallacy of composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that is true of some part of the whole Fallacy of Composition
Assuming casual relationships between two events based solely on the two events happening close in time, or "after this, therefore because of this." False Cause Fallacy
"Domino theory" and "ripple affect" aka one thing leads to another Slippery slope
Attacking someone personally while criticizing them in a totally different arena Ad hominem
Purposely misinterpeting or mistaking an opponents argument as a way to make it easier to denigrate or attack Straw Man Fallacy
Bringing up irrelevant issues that have more emotional appeal than the real issues in order to divert attention away from the point Red Herring
Claiming that a statement/argument is more valid because it comes from an authority figure Appeal to Authority
Claiming that a position is valid because it hasn't been proven wrong Ad Ignorantium
Claiming that the majority opinion must be the correct opinion Ad Populum

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

falsely assumes that one thing leads to another Slippery Slope
misrepresents a position to make it sound weaker Straw Man
authority figure affirms incoherent proposition Appeal to Authority
idea must be true because it is the popular opinion Appeal to Popularity
idea is dismissed because of who the source is Genetic
fallacy of distraction Red Herring
an assumption one makes based on insufficient evidence or biased information Hasty Generalization
someone is asked to choose between two ideas Flase Dichotomy
the reasoner beginswith what they are trying to end with Circular Argument
A question with a false, disputed, or question-begging presupposition. Loaded Question
An argument is given from which a perfectly valid and sound conclusion may be drawn, yet the stated conclusion is something else Missing the Point

Argument Techniques Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

comparison between two things that help us draw conclusions about their similarities analogy
a brief personal account or story anecdote
plays on people's tendency to react emotionally when their safety, security, country or loved ones are threatened appeal to fear
engages with people's belief that everyone deserves fair treatment appeal to justice
draws on national pride and people's loyalty to their country appeal to patriotism
an idea or statement that someone takes for granted as being true assumption
basing an argument on a premise that is the same as the conclusion begging the question
linking an outcome to a particular set of events or decisions cause and effect
examining general rules about a group to form a conclusion about one small part of the group deductive reasoning
facts, information or expert opinions used to support an argument evidence
a sweeping statement that claims that something is true for most or all cases because it is true in one or some instances generalisation
observing a series of specific events to from a more general theory about what is most likely happening inductive reasoning
the use of evidence or deduction to support a clear argument reason and logic
misrepresenting an opponent's argument in order to make it easier to rebut straw man argument
attacking or insulting a person rather than addressing their opinion or the facts ad hominem attack

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Misrepresenting someone's argument to make it easier to attack. strawman
Presuming that a real or perceived relationship between things means that one is the cause of the other false cause
Manipulating an emotional response in place of a valid or compelling argument appeal to emotion
Presuming that because a claim has been poorly argued, or a fallacy has been made, that it is necessarily wrong the fallacy fallacy
Asserting that if we allow "A" to happen, then "Z" will consequently happen too, therefore "A" should not happen slippery slope
Attacking you opponent's character of personal traits in an attempt to undermine their argument ad hominem
Avoiding having to engage with criticism by turning it back on the accuser - answering criticism with criticism tu quoque
Saying that because one finds something difficult to understand that it's therefore not true personal incredulity
Moving the goalposts to create exceptions when a claim is shown to be false special pleading
Asking a question that has an assumption built into it so that it can't be answered without appearing guilty loaded question
Saying that the burden of proof lies not with the person making the claim, but with someone else to disprove burden of proof
Using double meanings or ambiguities of language to mislead or misrepresent the truth ambiguity
Believing that 'runs' occur to statistically independent phenomena such as roulette wheel spins the gambler's fallacy
Appealing to popularity or the fact that man people do somethings as an attempted form of validation bandwagon
Using the opinion or position of an authority figure, or institution of authority, in place of an actual argument appeal to authority
Assuming that waht's true about one part of something has to be applied to all, or other, parts of it composition/division
Making what could be called an appeal to purity as a way to dismiss relevant criticisms or flaws of an argument no true scotsman
Judging something good or bad on the basis of where it comes from, or from whom it comes genetic
Where two alternative states are presented as the only possibilities, when in fact more possibilities exist black or white
A circular argument in which the conclusion is included in the premise begging the question
Making the argument that because something is 'natural' it is therefore valid, justified, inevitable, good, or ideal appeal to nature
Using personal experience or an isolated example instead of a valid argument, especially to dismiss statistics anecdotal
Cherry-picking data clusters to suit an argument, or finding a pattern to fit a presumption the texas sharpshooter
Saying that a compromise, or middle point, between two extremes is the truth middle ground

Logical Fallacies Word Search

Type
Word Search
Description

middle ground
the texas sharpshooter
genetic
no true scotsman
ambiguity
burden of proof
personal incredulity
tu quoque
the fallacy fallacy
appeal to emotion
anecdotal
composition/division
appeal to nature
appeal to authority
begging the question
black or white
bandwagon
the gambler's fallacy
loaded question
special pleading
ad hominem
slippery slope
false cause
strawman

Persuasive Vocabulary Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

a persuasive appeal that is used to show the credibility of the speaker (expert or celebrity) Ethos
a persuasive appeal that is used to evoke the emotions of the audience Pathos
a persuasive appeal that is uses logic through definitions, facts, or statistics to prove a point Logos
an error in thinking or arguing Fallacy
the author/creator of the persuasive appeals ethos, pathos, and logos Aristotle
to state something to be true with or without evidence Claim
a claim plus supporting reasons Thesis
a statement that creates an inferred conclusion Premise
a confident and forceful statement of fact or belief Assertion
language used to persuade an audience Rhetoric
the degree to which an objective is achieved Effectiveness
Judging the value or character of something; discussing the positive and negative advantages or disadvantages. Evaluate
A summary based on evidence or facts Conclusion
the available body of facts or information indicating whether a belief or proposition is true or valid. Evidence

Logical Fallacies Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

You misinterpret someone's argument to make it easier to attack. Strawman
You say that if we allow A to happen, then Z will eventually follow. Slippery Slope
You move the goalposts or make up an an exception when your claim was shown to be false. Special Pleading
You say runs occur to statistically independent phenomena. Gambler's Fallacy
You present two alternative states as the only possibilities, when in fact more exist. Black or White
You presume that a real or perceived relationship between things mean that one is the cause of the other False Cause
You attack your opponent's character in an attempt to undermine their argument. Adhominem
You ask a question that has a presumption built into it. loaded question
You appeal to popularity as an attempt at validation Bandwagon
You present a circular argument in which the conclusion was included in the premise Begging the question
You say that because an authority thinks something, it must be true. appeal to authority
You argue that because something is natural, it is therefore valid or ideal. appeal to nature
You assume that one part of something has to be applied to the rest. Compositiondivision
You use a personal experience instead of a sound argument. Anecdotal
You attempt to manipulate an emotional response in place of a valid argument. appeal to emotion
You avoid having to engage with criticism by turning it back on your opponent. tu quoque
You say that the burden of proof lies with someone to disprove your claim. Burden of proof
You make what could be called an appeal to purity as a way to dismiss relevant criticisms. no true scotsman
You cherry pick a data cluster to suit your argument. Texas sharpshooter

Satire Crossword Puzzle

Type
Crossword
Description

Celebrities Big Name
Emotion Pathos
Strong emotional implications Loaded Words
Being smaller Understatement
Imitation of a style Parody
Exaggeration Hyperbole
2 things with contrast Juxtaposition
Logic Logos
Illegitimate use of "or" False Dilemma
Attack on an opponent Ad Hominem
Irrelevant conclusion Non Sequitur
Fallacy which conclusion is not logical Hasty Generalization
Everyone believes it Bandwagon
Irrelevant topic diverts attention Red Herring
Flattery Appeal To Flattery
Credibility or character Ethos
Chain reaction Slippery Slope
Argument never gets to the point Circular Argument
Makes you think Rhetorical Question
Exaggerated Exaggeration
Contrast between 2 things Irony
Criticizes issues Satire

AP Language and Composition Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

These types of argument limit themselves not to the issues, but to the opposition itself. Writers who fall into this fallacy attempt to refute the claims of the opposition by bringing the opposition’s character into person. These arguments ignore the issues and attack the people. Ad hominem
A construction in which one word (usually a verb) modifies or governs (often in different, sometimes, incongruent ways) two or more words in a sentence. Zeugma
This argument tries to get everyone to agree the same way. Writers who use this approach try to convince the reader that everyone else believes in something, so the reader should as well. Also called Bandwagon. Ad populum
The device of using characters and/or story elements symbolically to represent an abstraction in addition to the literal meaning. In some allegories, an author may intend the characters to personify an abstraction, such as hope or freedom. The allegorical meaning usually deals with a moral truth or a generalization about human existence. Allegory
The repetition of sounds, especially initial consonants in two more neighboring words. Although this term is not used frequently, you can still look for alliteration in an essay passage and discuss it. Repetition reinforces meaning, unifies ideas and supplies a musical sound and/or echo to the sense of the passage. Alliteration
A direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably commonly known such as an event, book, myth, religion, nature, history or the supernatural. Allusion
The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence or passage Ambiguity
The repetition of word or phrase, followed by additional information; it is used both to clarify and intensify the meaning of the original word. Amplification
A similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them;can explain something unfamiliar by associating it with or pointing out its similarity to something more familiar. Analogies can also make writing more vivid, imaginative or intellectually engaging. Analogy
One of the devices of repetition in which the expression (word or words) is repeated at the beginning of two or more lines, clauses or sentences. Anaphora
A short narrative detailing particulars of an interesting episode or event. The term most frequently refers to an incident in the life of a person. Anecdote
A brief explanation, summary, or evaluation of a text or work of literature. Annotation
The quickness of intellect and the power and talent for saying brilliant things that surprise and delight by their unexpectedness; the power to comment subtly and pointedly on the foibles of the passing scene. Wit
An object, device or creation that is fanciful or rooted in unreality. Whimsy
In grammar, this is the relationship between a verb and a noun (for example, active or passive voice). In rhetoric, voice is a distinctive quality in the style and tone of the writing; the acknowledged or unacknowledged source of words of the story; the speaker’s or narrator’s particular “take” on an idea based on a particular passage and how all the elements of the style of the piece come together to express his or her feelings. Voice
An attitude that may lie under the ostensible tone of the piece. Undertone

Argumentative Writing Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

making a claim supporting it argument
making a claim supporting it using feelings persuasion
The position that you are trying to get your reader to accept claim
Facts that support your claim evidence
Statement that explains how the evidence supports and connects to the claim bridge
Challenging the argument by addressing the position of someone who may not agree with the argument counterargument
Demonstrating why the counterargument is wrong refutation
Who will be affected by the topic. Who will read the essay. audience
Also known as claim Thesis statement
First paragraph where you will hook the reader introduction
Paragraph that introduces the reason that your claim is valid Body Paragraph 1
Paragraph that introduces the second reason that your claim is valid Body Paragraph 2
Paragraph that introduces an opposing claim Body Paragraph 3
Last paragraph that restates the thesis statement conclusion
The first sentence in each paragraph that tells you what the paragraph is talking about topic sentence
words that show the relationships among the ideas in a piece of writing transition

Argument analysis technique's Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

A comparison between two things that helps the reader to draw conclusions about their similarities analogy
Suggests that families are good, especially traditional nuclear families appeal to family values
A story about someone or something that the writer has experienced or heard about Anecdote
Examining general rules and facts about a group to form a specific conclusion about one part of the group Deductive Reasoning
Overused phrase quickly understood by a wide audience Cliche
Repetition of a consonant, especially at the start of words Alliteration
Evidence in a visual form graphs and diagrams
Language that has a strong emotional impact. Uses the positive and negative connotations of words to influence the readers respond Emotive language
Uses 'we' 'our' 'us' etc. to include the readers in the same group as the writer Inclusive language
Figure of speech that identify a similarity between two different things. Metaphor and simile
Exaggerates the true situation for dramatic impact Exaggeration
Used to link together and develop an argument in support of the main contention reason and logic
Plays on people's tendency to react emotionally with their safety, security, country or loved ones as threatened appeal to fear
An idea or statement that someone takes for granted as being true assumption
facts, information or expert opinions to support an argument evidence