Type
Word Search
Description

observatory
radio telescope
reflecting telescope
convex lens
refracting telescope
optical telescope
spectrum
wavelength
visible light
electromagnetic radiation
telescope

Telescopes Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

the distance between two corresponding parts of a wave wavelength
the energy transferred through space by electromagnetic waves electromagnetic radiation
electromagnetic radiation that can be seen with the unaided eye visible light
the range of wavelengths of electromagnetic waves spectrum
An telescope that uses lenses or mirrors to collect and focus visible light optical
A telescope that uses convex lenses to gather and focus light refracting
a lens that is thicker in the center than at the edges concave
a lens that is thicker at the edges and thinner in the middle concave
A telescope that uses a curved mirror to collect and focus light reflecting
A building that contains one or more telescopes observatory
A telescope used to detect radio waves from objects in space radio
Instruments that collect and focus magnetic radiation from space Telescopes

Electromagnetic Spectrum Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

Part of the electromagnetic spectrum that has the longest wavelength Radio Wave
Distance from a center line to the top of a crest or the bottom of a trough Amplitude
The distance between crests of a wave Wavelength
Allows us to see the colors of the stars Visible Telescope
Detect wavelengths emitted from hot stars Ultraviolet telescope
Our biggest evidence that the universe is expanding and the big bang happened Red Shift
A theory our universe began as a single atom and began a violent expansion at the speed of light Big Bang
Helps us detect black holes Xray telescope
Detects what an item is made up of Visible Color
Part of the electromagnetic spectrum that has the highest frequency Gammaray
Form of energy that is all around us and takes many forms ERM
Range of all types of radiation. EM Spectrum
These detect infrared rays of heat Infrared Telescope
One Earth Year Revolution
Number of waves passing a point in a certain time. Frequency
Energy being emitted from a source Light

Optics Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

A type of optical telescope that uses a lens as its objective to form an image. refracting
Is an optical telescope which uses curved mirrors that reflect light and form an image. reflecting
The _____lens in a telescope focuses the light to a point in front of the eyepiece. objective
Another word for nearsightedness myopia
Images are formed behind the retina, not on it, and this causes close-up images to be blurry. hyperopia
The most common cause of blindness cataracts
The pupil gets____in bright light. smaller
The aqueous humour is the ____fluid, that fills the front part of the eyeball. clear
The ___ spot is where the optic nerve leaves the retina. blind
The coloured part of the eye. iris
The _____body is a circular muscle that enables the lens to change shape for focusing. ciliary
The _____is a layer of blood vessels that nourishes the eye. choroid
With refraction of light no image is formed when the object is at the_____point. focal
A lens that makes light rays come together is called a _____lens. convex
These lenses make light spread apart. concave
A _____and dark-coloured surface will absorb light the most. rough
Concave mirrors are also called _________mirrors converging
Your image will be upright, but much smaller than what you normally see in this kind of mirror. plane
The ability to let light rays in. transparent
Light can partially get through.. translucent
Allows no light to get through. Opaque
,Light can travel in a straight line just like _____. waves
When the sunlight passes from the air through rain droplets before reaching your eyes, what is this called? dispersion
Different _______of light have different wavelengths. colours
Where does the energy of the electromagnetic spectrum come from? sun
,As the wavelength gets shorter, both the frequency and energy _______. increase
Which rays are the highest forms of electromagnetic radiation? gamma
Waves where the particles of the medium vibrate with an up and down motion. transverse
What is the branch of science called that deals with the study of waves that travel through the Earth? seismology
What kind of wave can you see on the water on a windy day? surface

Mirrors and Lenses Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

The behavior of light Optics
A device that generates an intense beam of coherent monochromatic light Laser
A reflective surface Mirror
A piece of glass or other transparent substance Lense
The point at which rays or waves meet after reflection or refraction Focal Point
Surface of light, heat, and sound Reflection
Phenomenon of light and radio waves Refraction
Electromagnetic radiation Ultraviolet
The angle that an incident of line or rays make Angle of incidence
Deals with light and vision Optical System
Wavelength that is greater than visible light Infrared light
Process or state of diverging Divergent
An outline or surface curved outward like a circle or sphere Convex
An outline or surface that curves inward like a cirlce or sphere Concave
Coming together from different directions until they eventually meet Convergent

Mirrors and Lenses Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

We use this to see our reflection. mirrors
Light from us bounces off of a mirror to show us how we look reflection
Our eyes go through this process to give us sight refraction
if we look at a table and cannot see through it, the table is _____. opaque
This object uses different lenses to magnify and enhance the apperance of an object we are observing. microscope
This either refracts, reflects, or absorbs light to change the way we view objects. lense
Most windows are ______, because we can see through them and they absorb a little light. Transparent
tranfers impulse to the brain for sight Optic Nerves
Where a wave moves apart Rarefaction
A sensitive membrane at the back of the inside of an eye retina
An outward-curved lens convex
______ makes things visible light
An inward-curved lens concave
A ______ regulates the amount of light entering the eye pupil
The ______ focuses light waves on the retina focal point
The ______ refract light entering the eye and sends it to the back of the eye cornea
The act of seeing sight
This device uses highly concentrated light laser
transmission of some light but can cause it to disort translucent
Able to be seen visible
An optical tool that uses refraction to seperate different wavelengths that make up white light prism

Electromagnetic Spectrum Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

he emission or transmission of energy in the form of waves or particles through space or through a material medium radiation
EM waves with frequencies between microwaves and visible light infrared light
electromagnetic waves with the lowest frequencies radio waves
the range of all electromagnetic frequencies electromagnetic spectrum
a type of wave that does not require a medium to travel; a disturbance that transfers energy through a field electromagnetic wave
EM waves with frequencies above visible light and below x-rays ultraviolet light
EM waves with frequencies between ultraviolet light and gamma rays x-rays
electromagnetic waves with the highest frequencies gamma rays
the passage of a wave through a medium transmission
a tool that uses refraction to separate the wavelengths that make up light prism
the part of the EM spectrum that human eyes can see visible light
EM waves that are used in radar and cell phones microwaves

Waves and Electromagnetic Spectrum Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

For waves on the surface of the ocean or lakes wave
This article is about the scalar physical quantity enegry
a measurement that indicates the movement or vibration of something (such as a sound wave or a radio wave) amplitude
Frequency is the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit time frequency
In physics, the wavelength of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats, wavelength
the lowest turning point of a wave cycle trough
A crest is a point on the wave where the displacement of the medium is at a maximum. crest
A transverse wave is a moving wave that consists of oscillations occurring perpendicular to the direction of energy transfer. transverse wave
Longitudinal waves, also known as "l waves", are waves in which the displacement of the medium is in the same direction as, or the opposite direction to, the direction of travel of the wave. longitudinal wave
the point or place where something begins or is created line of origin
Infrared (IR) is invisible radiant energy, infared light
Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum longer than infrared light. radio waves
Ultraviolet (UV) light is an electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength from 10 nm (30 PHz) to 380 nm (750 THz), shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays. ultraviolet light
A gamma wave is a pattern of neural oscillation in humans with a frequency between 25 and 100 Hz,[1] though 40 Hz is typical.[2] gamma waves
Visible light waves are the only electromagnetic waves we can see visible light
Space void of matter. vacuum
is a form of electromagnetic radiation x-ray waves
a type of electromagnetic radiation, as are radio waves, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays and gamma-rays microwaves
pertaining to, or produced by electromagnetism. electromagnetic

photography Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible. Light
a form of electromagnetic (EM) radiation, as are radio waves, infrared radiation, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays and microwaves. Generally, visible light is defined as the wavelengths that are visible to most human eyes Visible ligt
apparently colorless light, for example ordinary daylight. It contains all the wavelengths of the visible spectrum at equal intensity. White Light
The distance - from peak to peak in a light wave - that determines the color of the light Wavelength
the rate at which a vibration occurs that constitutes a wave, either in a material (as in sound waves), or in an electromagnetic field (as in radio waves and light), usually measured per second. Frequency
a fundamental physical constant that is the speed at which electromagnetic radiation propagates in a vacuum and that has a value fixed by international convention of 299,792,458 meters per second Speed of Light
the light-gathering device of a camera lens
a lens that causes parallel rays (as of light) to come to a focus. converging lens
a lens that causes a beam of parallel rays to diverge after refraction, as from a virtual image diverging lens
a device for recording visual images in the form of photographs, film, or video signals. camera
a camera setting corresponding to a particular f-number f-stop
a space through which light passes in an optical or photographic instrument, especially the variable opening by which light enters a camera. aperture
a device that opens and closes to expose the film in a camera. shutter
the time for which a shutter is open at a given setting. shutter speed
a digital camera combining the optics and the mechanisms of a single-lens reflex camera with a digital imaging sensor SLR
the position of a viewed object or the adjustment of an optical device necessary to produce a clear image focus
the distance between the nearest and the furthest objects that give an image judged to be in focus in a camera. depth of field
a room from which normal light is excluded, used for developing photographs. darkroom
a thin flexible strip of plastic or other material coated with light-sensitive emulsion for exposure in a camera, used to produce photographs or motion pictures. film
a light source suitable for use in a photographic darkroom safe light
a light-sensitive coating for photographic films and plates, containing crystals of a silver compound dispersed in a medium such as gelatin. emulsion
The silver crystals that make up an image on a negative or print silver halide
the measure of a photographic film's sensitivity to light, determined by sensitometry and measured on various numerical scales film speed
equal iso
a sealed plastic unit containing a length of audiotape, videotape, film, etc. wound on a pair of spools, for insertion into a recorder or playback device. cassette
an image on an exposed film or print that has not yet been made visible by developing. latent image
a photographic image made on film or specially prepared glass that shows the light and shade or color values reversed from the original, and from which positive prints can be made. negative
a chemical agent used for treating photographic film to make a visible image developer
a bath for stopping the action of a preceding bath by neutralizing any of its chemical still present. stop bath
a substance used for fixing a photographic image. fixer
the chemical sodium thiosulphate (formerly called hyposulphite) used as a photographic fixer. hypo
will reduce wash time, and help eliminate any of the magenta sensitizing dye so you will get nice clear film base. hypo clearing agent
wetting agent, dip your final film into photo flo
cleaning agent such as soap and water water wash
the action of briskly stirring or disturbing something, especially a liquid agitation

Waves,sound,and light Crossword

Type
Crossword
Description

is a lens that possesses at least one surface that curves inwards concave lens
involve the transport of energy without the transport of matte waves
s a wave that is an oscillation of matter, and therefore transfers energy through a medium. mechanical wave
oscillates perpendicular to the axis along which the wave travels transverse wave
is a region in a longitudinal wave where the particles are closest together. compressional wave
hat are propagated by simultaneous periodic variations of electric and magnetic field intensity electromagnetic waves
the maximum extent of a vibration or oscillation, measured from the position of equilibrium. amplitude
distance between one peak or crest of a wave and the next peak or crest. wavelength
common unit of frequency is the hertz (Hz), corresponding to one crest per second. frequency
The change in direction of a wave, such as a light or sound wave, away from a boundary the wave encounters. reflection
typically accompanied by interference between the wave forms produced. diffraction
he process in which two or more light, sound, or electromagnetic waves of the same frequency combine to reinforce or cancel each other interference
is the characteristic of a sound that is primarily a psycho-physiological correlate of physical strength (amplitude). loudness
a sound is determined by the rate of vibration, or frequency, of the sound wave. pitch
a sound or series of sounds caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener. echo
an increase (or decrease) in the frequency of sound, light, or other waves as the source and observer move toward (or away from) each other Doppler effect
a typical example: "the science or art of ordering tones or sounds in succession, in combination, and in temporal relationships music
which a system oscillates when not subjected to a continuous or repeated external force. natural frequency
ncrease in amplitude of oscillation of an electric resonance
ncrease in amplitude of oscillation of an electric fundamental frequency
that is a part of the harmonic series above a fundamental note and may be heard with it. overtone
series above a fundamental note and may be heard with it. overtones
prolongaprolongation of a sound; resonance. reverberation
vibrates in response to sound waves; the tympanic membrane. eardrum
one of the waves that are propagated by simultaneous periodic variations of electric and magnetic field intensity electromagnet wave
energy that travels by waves or particles, particularly electromagnetic radiation such as heat or x-rays. radiant energy
an electromagnetic wave of a frequency between about 104 and 1011 or 1012 Hz, as used for long-distance communication radio waves
light rays which are longer than light but shorter than radio waves. Electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength between infrared waves
a form of electromagnetic (EM) radiation, as are radio waves, infrared radiation, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays and microwaves. visible light
in the part of the electromagnetic spectrum where wavelengths are just shorter than those of ordinary, visible violet light but longer than those of x-rays. ultraviolet radiation
stream of such photons used for their penetrating power in radiography, radiology, radiotherapy, and scientific research. xrays
penetrating electromagnetic radiation of a kind arising from the radioactive decay of atomic nuclei. gamma rays
a high-frequency electromagnetic wave modulated in amplitude or frequency to convey a signal. carrier waves
system of satellites, computers, and receivers that is able to determine the latitude and longitude of a receiver on Earth by calculating the time difference for signals from different satellites to reach the receiver. global positioning system
he range of wavelengths or frequencies over which electromagnetic radiation extends. electromagnetic spectrum
the range of wavelengths electromagnetic spectrum

Electromagnetic Waves Word Search

Type
Word Search
Description

Electromagnetic Radiation
Electromagnetic Spectrum
Electromagnetic Wave
Fluorescent Light
Gamma Rays
Illuminated
Incandescent Light
Infrared Rays
Luminous
Microwaves
Neon Light
Photoelectric Effect
Photon
Polarized Light
Radio Waves
Spectroscope
Thermogram
Tungsten Halogen Light
Ultraviolet Rays
Vapor Light
Visible Light
X Rays