a nation that is dominated politically by another
Satellite Nations
preventing the expansion of a hostile country or influence
Containment
a state of political hostility between countries characterized by threats, propaganda, and other measures short of open warfare
Cold War
the art or practice of pursuing a dangerous policy to the limits of safety before stopping, typically in politics
Brinkmanship
Chinese Communist revolutionary and the founding father of the People's Republic of China
Mao Zedong
premier of the Soviet Union in the late 1950s and early 1960s, led a campaign, called de-Stalinization, to remove the influence of the late premier Joseph Stalin from Soviet society
Nikita Khrushchev
United States U-2 spy plane was shot down while in Soviet airspace
U2 incident
1950 American 16mm short documentary film
Hollywood Ten
strengthened laws against espionage, allowed investigation and deportation of immigrants who were suspected of subversive activities or of promoting communism or fascism, and allowed the limitation of
Internal Security Act
each of a series of Soviet artificial satellites, the first of which (launched on October 4, 1957) was the first satellite to be placed in orbit
Sputnik
agency of the United States Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program as well as aeronautics and aerospace research
NASA
signed into law on September 2, 1958, providing funding to United States education institutions at all levels
NDEA
an American astronaut and the first person to walk on the Moon. He was also an aerospace engineer, naval aviator, test pilot, and university professor
Neil Armstrong
any of the Southern Democrats who seceded from the party in 1948 in opposition to its policy of extending civil rights.
Dixiecrats
an ambitious set of proposals put forward by U.S. President Harry S. Truman to Congress in his January 1949 State of the Union address
Fair Deal
the use of largely automatic equipment in a system of manufacturing or other production process.
Automation
a temporary marked increase in the birth rate, especially the one following World War II
Baby Boom
The law authorized the construction of a 41,000-mile network of interstate highways that would span the nation
Highway Act
the redevelopment of areas within a large city, typically involving the clearance of slums
Urban Renewal
a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional.
Brown v. Board of Edu
a group of nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957
Little Rock Nine
the first civil rights legislation passed by Congress in the United States since the 1866 and 1875 Acts
Civil Rights Act of 1957
Cuban politician and revolutionary who governed the Republic of Cuba as its Prime Minister from 1959 to 1976 and then its President from 1976 to 2008
Fidel Castro
A slogan used by President John F. Kennedy to describe his goals and policies
New Frontier
a domestic program in the administration of President Lyndon B. Johnson that instituted federally sponsored social welfare programs.
Great Society
the practice of achieving goals such as social change through symbolic protests, civil disobedience, economic or political noncooperation, satyagraha, or other methods, without using violence
Nonviolent Resistance