The sudden death of brain cells due to lack of oxygen, caused by blockage of blood flow or rupture of an artery to the brain. Sudden loss of speech, weakness, or paralysis of one side of the body can be symptoms.
stroke
an abdominal organ involved in the production and removal of blood cells in most vertebrates and forming part of the immune system. 2.
spleen
less technical term for erythrocyte
redbloodcell
any of the tubes forming part of the blood circulation system of the body, carrying in most cases oxygen-depleted blood toward the heart.
vein
any of the muscular-walled tubes forming part of the circulation system by which blood (mainly that which has been oxygenated) is conveyed from the heart to all parts of the body.
artery
either of two small masses of lymphoid tissue in the throat, one on each side of the root of the tongue.
tonsils
a blood protein produced in response to and counteracting a specific antigen. Antibodies combine chemically with substances that the body recognizes as alien, such as bacteria, viruses, and foreign substances in the blood.
antibody
a respiratory condition marked by spasms in the bronchi of the lungs, causing difficulty in breathing. It usually results from an allergic reaction or other forms of hypersensitivity.
asthma
the presence in or introduction into the air of a substance which has harmful or poisonous effects.
airpollution
a condition marked by a deficiency of red blood cells or of hemoglobin in the blood, resulting in pallor and weariness.
anemia
the colorless fluid part of blood, lymph, or milk, in which corpuscles or fat globules are suspended.
plasma
a small colorless disk-shaped cell fragment without a nucleus, found in large numbers in blood and involved in clotting.
platelet
each of the two upper cavities of the heart from which blood is passed to the ventricles. The right receives deoxygenated blood from the veins of the body; the left receives oxygenated blood from the pulmonary vein.
atrium
any of the fine branching blood vessels that form a network between the arterioles and venules.
capillary
a hollow part or cavity in an organ, in particular. each of the two main chambers of the heart, left and right. each of the four connected fluid-filled cavities in the center of the brain.
ventricle
less technical term for leukocyte.
whitebloodcell
the pressure of the blood in the circulatory system, often measured for diagnosis since it is closely related to the force and rate of the heartbeat and the diameter and elasticity of the arterial walls.
bloodpressure
inflammation of the mucous membrane in the bronchial tubes. It typically causes bronchospasm and coughing.
bronchitis
the process of transferring the blood of a person into the veins of another
bloodtransfusion
a compound of the sterol type found in most body tissues, including the blood and the nerves. Cholesterol and its derivatives are important constituents of cell membranes and precursors of other steroid compounds, but high concentrations in the blood (mainly derived from animal fats in the diet) are thought to promote atherosclerosis.
cholesterol
a hereditary disorder affecting the exocrine glands. It causes the production of abnormally thick mucus, leading to the blockage of the pancreatic ducts, intestines, and bronchi and often resulting in respiratory infection.
cysticfibrosis
a colorless fluid containing white blood cells, that bathes the tissues and drains through the lymphatic system into the bloodstream.
lymph
each of a number of small swellings in the lymphatic system where lymph is filtered and lymphocytes are formed.
lymphnode
abnormally high blood pressure. a state of great psychological stress.
hypertension
a red protein responsible for transporting oxygen in the blood of vertebrates. Its molecule comprises four subunits, each containing an iron atom bound to a heme group.
hemoglobin