the process of eroding or being eroded by wind, water, or other natural agents
erosion
the process of breaking big rocks into little ones. This process usually happens near the surface of the planet
mechanical weathering
the erosion or disintegration of rocks, building materials, etc., caused by chemical reactions (chiefly with water and substances dissolved in it) rather than by mechanical processes.
chemical weathering
is caused by the repeated freeze-thaw cycle of water in extreme climates. Most rocks have small cracks in them, called joints (or, tectonic joints). When it rains, rainwater seeps into these joints. As the day cools and temperatures at night drop below freezing, the water inside the joints freezes.
frost wedging
an area damaged by scraping or wearing away.
abrasion
the process of rocks wearing there old surface off
exfoliation
the chemical breakdown of a compound due to reaction with water.
hydrolysis
ainfall made sufficiently acidic by atmospheric pollution that it causes environmental harm, typically to forests and lakes. The main cause is the industrial burning of coal and other fossil fuels, the waste gases from which contain sulfur and nitrogen oxides, which combine with atmospheric water to form acids.
acid rain
the process or result of oxidizing or being oxidized.
oxidation
the movement of surface material caused by gravity.
mass movement
move slowly and carefully, especially in order to avoid being heard or noticed.
creep
a fluid or hardened stream or avalanche of mud.
mud flow
separate or be separated into parts
divide
an extent or an area of land where surface water from rain, melting snow, or ice converges to a single point at a lower elevation, usually the exit of the basin
drainage basin
particles in a flowing fluid (usually water) that are transported along the bed.
bed load
allow (a liquid, gas, or other substance) to flow out from where it has been confined.
discharge
a river thats conected to other rivers
river system
a mixture in which particles are dispersed throughout the bulk of a fluid.
suspension
an increase or decrease in the magnitude of a property (e.g., temperature, pressure, or concentration) observed in passing from one point or moment to another.
gradient
the maximum amount that something can contain.
capacity
a curved lake formed at a former oxbow where the main stream of the river has cut across the narrow end and no longer flows around the loop of the bend.
oxbow lake
a winding curve or bend of a river or road.
meander
an area of low-lying ground adjacent to a river, formed mainly of river sediments and subject to flooding.
flood plain
the ability to do something successfully or efficiently.
competence
a landform that forms from deposition of sediment carried by a river as the flow leaves its mouth and enters slower-moving or standing water. This occurs where a river enters an ocean, sea, estuary, lake, reservoir, or (more rarely) another river that cannot transport away the supplied sediment
delta
a river or stream flowing into a larger river or lake.
tributary
an area or ridge of land that separates waters flowing to different rivers, basins, or seas.
watershed